COVID-19 Guidance and Resources

WSASP has released its COVID-19 Closure Guidance Document.

Please submit additional questions not addressed by this document using this submission form.

Click here to access current OSPI guidance for special education. School psychologists should follow district guidance and procedures.

Click here to access the NASP COVID-19 Resource Center.

Spring Lecture Series 2020

Our 2020 Spring Lecture Series is now available for registration. See our line up of talks here and register for this amazing webinar series here

Research Opportunities

In an effort to assist students, professors, and school psychologists with survey and research efforts, WSASP shares requests with our membership by posting research opportunities on our website. In addition, we include our research opportunities list as a link in the Prior Written Notice, a bi-weekly newsletter that goes out to all of our members. We do not send out specific survey requests via email to our association’s members.  

Researchers, Click here to submit your research study to be listed below.

All information is current as of 5/13/2020.

Adaptation and Modification of the ADOS-2 for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students

You are invited to participate in a survey about school psychologists’ experiences using the ADOS-2 with culturally and linguistically diverse students. We believe that the results of this study will provide valuable information to school psychologists and graduate educators with modifications or adaptations with the ADOS-2 for diverse students as well as learn more about the professional development and training needs surrounding culturally responsive school-based autism assessments for practitioners.

This study has been approved by the Institutional Review Board (Protocol #10834) at Utah State University. Participation is voluntary and is anticipated to take 20-30 minutes to complete. Participation can lead to a drawing of 1 of 2 $50 gift cards. All responses will be kept strictly confidential. There is no foreseeable risk to participants and you may opt out at any time. If you have any general questions about the survey, please contact the principal investigator, Maryellen McClain Verdoes, PhD at maryellen.mcclainverdoes@usu.edu.

Click here to take this survey.


Predictors of School Psychologists' use of Exposure-Based Interventions

In this study, researchers will examine current practices regarding school psychologists' use of exposure-based interventions for youth anxiety. Predictors of use will be examined, including psychologists' knowledge, attitudes, comfort, self-efficacy, and training regarding exposure-based interventions. The researchers will identify barriers and facilitators of using exposure and other evidence-based interventions in schools.

School psychologists currently practicing in the United States will be asked to complete a survey, which includes primarily closed-ended questions (multiple choice, Likert scale) and several open-ended questions, for participants who wish to elaborate. The results will be examined with descriptive statistics, multiple regression analyses, and qualitative analysis of open-ended responses. For more information, contact Sheva Weiss at sc1716@gsapp.rutgers.edu.

Click here to take this survey.


The Evolution of School Psychological Services in the Times of Crisis

You are invited to participate in a collaborative research study between school psychology researchers in the state of New York. The primary researchers include Dr. Elizabeth M. Power (The College of Saint Rose), Mr. Gary Schaffer (Niagara University), Dr. Amy Fisk (SUNY Geneseo), and their research team. In the midst of the COVID-19 (“coronavirus”) pandemic, school psychologists are compelled to rethink the manner in which educational services are carried out. Despite the fact that children are not able to attend school during this time, educational provisions have not stopped in the majority of U.S. states. With many K-12 schools offering online/distance learning, school psychologists are becoming creative in the ways in which they provide support to students and staff. We are looking to gain information from school psychologists across the United States whose roles and responsibilities have been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. Our primary goal is to better understand how the roles and responsibilities of practitioners of school psychology have shifted due to schools either closing or offering distance learning platforms for students. A secondary goal of this study is to understand the obstacles school psychologists have faced in regards to servicing students partaking in distance learning and whether they view any benefits to such learning. For more information, contact Elizabeth (Liz) Power at powere@strose.edu.

Click here to take this survey.


So, What's The Big Deal About Self Care?

The practice of school psychology can be extremely stressful as evidenced by the current burn-out rate of school psychologists. To combat this burn out problem, it is becoming increasingly necessary for school psychologists to incorporate self-care into their daily routines, not only for personal satisfaction but also to meet ethical obligations. The current study will collect data from school psychology practitioners in order to write a best practices manuscript aimed at providing recommendations for self care. With the current COVID-19 pandemic, there are a couple questions that have been included on utilizing self care during this time of crisis. This research study is being conducted by Dr. Jim Deni, School Psychology, Appalachian State University and Dr. Stephanie Corcoran, School Psychology, University of Alabama at Birmingham. For more information, contact Sarah Daniel at danielse@appstate.edu. 

Click here to take this survey.


Survey of School Psychologist's Role in School Crisis

The current study seeks to replicate the investigation of the role of the school psychologists in crisis intervention and prevention conducted by Nickerson and Zhe (2004). The purpose of this study is to gain insight into changes that have occurred surrounding the school psychologists role amongst crisis intervention, prevention, recovery strategies and their perceived effectiveness of those strategies that are used in their settings in the 16 years from which the original version of this study was submitted (Nickerson & Zhe, 2004). Using electronic administration of a twenty-two item survey, the study will seek to gain important information regarding the types of crisis' most commonly experienced by school psychologists, the role of the school psychologists in the evaluation, development and implementation of various crisis planning, prevention, intervention and recovery strategies, who else school psychologists work with in crisis, barriers and resource needed to successfully complete crisis work and perceived effectiveness of strategies employed by schools. Findings of this survey will add to the growing body of research inquiry focused on crisis in schools, and further support training and graduate programs in equipping school professionals with the knowledge and skills necessary to be successful. For more information, contact Caitlin Villa at caitlin.villa@ucdenver.edu.

Click here to take this survey.


School Psychologists in Traditional and Non-Traditional Settings

We are looking to gain information from those who were trained in school psychology, who work in traditional (e.g., public schools) and nontraditional settings (e.g., state and community agencies, hospitals, private practice) across the country to better understand the roles and responsibilities and choices to work in respective settings. Our primary goal is to explore the roles and responsibilities of applied school psychologists in alternative practice settings and why practitioners of school psychology chose these settings over the public schools. A secondary goal is to understand how the everyday duties of nontraditional school psychologists may be aligned with the roles and responsibilities currently established by the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) Practice Model compared to school psychologists in traditional public school settings. We believe that this data will yield implications for school psychologist graduate training programs in guiding students toward careers that align with their experience and interests. For more information, contact Elizabeth M. Power at powere@strose.edu.

Click here to take this survey.


School Psychologist Perceptions, School Environment, and Affective Well-being

This is a study about school psychologists' work experience. This study is designed to gather information on affective states and associated variables. The overarching goal of this study is to examine the nature of the relationship between factors within the school environment, school psychologist perceptions and affective well-being. For more information, contact Oksana Huk at ohuk@iona.edu.

Click here to take this survey.


The Acceptability Among School Psychologists of Social Media as a Medium to Communicate and Obtain Research-Based and Practice-Related Information

The purpose of this study is to establish a baseline knowledge and explore school psychologists beliefs, attitudes, and current practices in regard to the use of social media for communicating and obtaining evidence-based research for practice. We believe that enhancing science communication among our field will increase the use of providing students, schools, and families with evidence-based practices. We know that relevant research may take years to be adopted into practice. Social media may be a useful platform to enhance these connections. This information will help us better understand if social media is an effective medium to increase science communication in our field. For more information, contact Christina Pynn at cpynn@okstate.edu.

Click here to take this survey.


School Psychologists’ Compliance with Fairness Standards when evaluating English Learners

The current study will examine how school psychologists conduct cognitive assessments for native English speakers in comparison to English learners in order to determine if these practices follow Fairness Standards in order to clarify best practices that may qualify as a standard for the future. For more information, contact Noelle Ferrara at noelle.ferrara12@stjohns.edu. 

Click here to take this survey.


Identity-Based Harassment in Schools

Markeda Newell and Ashley Mayworm, Professors in School Psychology at Loyola University Chicago, are working together to conduct a study on identity-based harassment that occurs in Pre K-12 schools. Understanding how school psychologists address this form of harassment will help inform the profession as to the training needs of school psychologists so that they can develop best practices for school psychologists to use when serving children. The online survey includes 47 questions about school psychologists' knowledge, attitudes, and skills regarding addressing identity-based harassment that occurs in schools. No identifying information about schools will be collected and at the end of the survey, participants will be asked if you would like to participate in an optional follow-up interview. For more information, contact Dr. Markeda Newell at mnewell2@luc.edu.

Click here to take this survey.  


An Investigation of IDEA Classification Decisions

You are invited to participate in a survey about the IDEA identification decisions school psychologists make and their contributing factors. We believe that the results of this study will provide valuable information to school-based practitioners, researchers, trainers, and policy makers in better understanding the decision-making patterns and contributing factors to IDEA disability category identification. This study has been approved by the Institutional Review Board (Protocol #10833) at Utah State University. Participation is voluntary and is anticipated to take 20-30 minutes or less to complete. All responses will be kept strictly confidential. There is no foreseeable risk to participants and you may opt out at any time. Participants who complete the survey will be entered in a drawing for a chance to win a $100 gift card to Amazon.com. For more information, contact Megan Golson at megan.golson@gmail.com. 

Click here to take this survey.


Knowledge and Familiarity of Selective Mutism

You are invited to participate in a research study conducted by Matt Carter and Kirsten Williams at Valdosta State University. The purpose of this study is to compare the knowledge bases of multiple professions regarding the assessment and treatment of selective mutism. For more information about the study, please contact Matt Carter at mdcarter@valdosta.edu

If you wish to participate, please use the following link to the survey.

 

Identification of Specific Learning Disability

Karolina Nicewicz, a doctoral candidate from St. John's University, is conducting a research study to better understand the identification of specific learning disability. Practicing school psychologists are asked to take part in this 20-minute online survey. You will be asked to read several vignettes containing information regarding students referred for evaluations due to significant learning and academic difficulties. You will then be asked to rate your level of confidence with identifying the students as SLD for each vignette. Questions regarding this study can be directed to Karolina Nicewicz at karolina.nicewicz14@stjohns.edu

If you wish to participate, please use the following link to the survey. 

Cultural Competency

Dr. Tara Raines, a faculty member from the Mordridge College of Education at the University of Denver, is conducting a research study to examine factors that include cultural competency. Practicing school psychologists and school psychology graduate students are asked to take part in this 20-minute online self-survey. Eligible participants may gain insight on the measurement of cultural competency, as well as factors that influence self-perceived cultural competency. Participation is voluntary; participants will be entered into a drawing to win a $50 Amazon gift card. Questions regarding this study can be directed to Dr. Tara Raines at Tara.Raines@du.edu.

If you wish to participate, please use the following link to the survey.
 

Early Childhood Settings 

You are invited to participate in a research study examining the professional practices of school psychologists working in early childhood settings. For the purposes of this study, early childhood includes settings for children ages 3-5. These settings include but are not limited to Head Start, public preschools, private preschools, and early childhood special education. Although attention to the expansion of the role of school psychologists in early childhood settings has intensified, little is actually known about the current professional practices of school psychologists who work in early childhood settings.

In order to participate, you must be a school psychologist providing services in early childhood settings. Participation in this study is completely voluntary. The survey will take about 15-20 minutes. Participants have the option to enter a drawing to win one of four $25 Amazon gift cards. Participant responses will be anonymous. Questions regarding this study can be directed to Dr. Kizzy Albritton at kalbritt@kent.edu. 

If you wish to participate, please use the following link to the survey.


Professional Roles and Practices

You are asked to take part in a research project to assess perceptions of professional roles and practices of school psychologists. This project is being conducted by Erin M. McClure, M.A. in the Department of Educational Studies at The Ohio State University. Your participation in this project is greatly appreciated and will take approximately 10 minutes to fill out the questionnaire. Should you have any questions about the research project, please feel free to contact Erin McClure at (330) 317-7794 or McClure.497@osu.edu. Each participant who completes the survey will be entered in a drawing to win one of two $100 gift cards to Amazon. 

If you wish to participate, please use the following link to the survey.


Cognitive-Behavioral Counseling Programs

Stephanie Schwartz is in her fourth year of the school psychology program at St. John's University. Ms. Schwartz's doctoral research is examining the perceived acceptability and effectiveness of a cognitive-behavioral counseling program to identify factors that influence school psychologist and school administrator perceptions of the program. Participation in the study will take approximately 10 minutes and involves completing an electronic questionnaire. Participants will be asked questions about demographics and will be asked to read a brief description of a counseling program and answer related questions. 

If you wish to participate, please use the following link to the survey.


Applied Behavioral Analysis

Tara Stevens, Ed.D. is a Professor of Educational Psychology at Texas Tech University. Dr. Stevens reports that school psychologists use a wide variety of evidenced based interventions but little is known about how their training and confidence as well as supervisor support related to intervention implementation. Dr. Stevens would like to learn about how the use of Applied Behavior Analysis and related principles in the work of school psychologists. No identifying information will be collected and data will be analyzed as a group. The survey should take a total of 10 to 15 minutes complete. Please be clear that participation is voluntary, anonymous, and yields no financial benefit for the researchers. 

Please contact Dr. Stevens at tara.stevens@ttu.edu with any questions you have about the study or concerns regarding confidentiality and/or data management.

If you wish to participate, please use the following link to the survey.


Progress Monitoring Practices of Schools

Meghan Silva, CAGS, NCSP is a doctoral candidate at The University of Massachusetts Boston. Ms. Silva is conducting a brief survey of currently practicing school psychologists to identify their experiences involving progress monitoring in multi-tiered systems of support (MTSS). Progress monitoring practices have been highlighted as a critical component in the success of MTSS. However, it remains unclear to what degree schools use best practices when collecting and analyzing these data. Practicing school psychologists are invited to participate in a research study examining the progress monitoring practices occurring in schools. Responses will be anonymous; by completing the approximately 15-minute survey participants can be entered in a raffle to win one of two $25 Amazon gift cards!

If you have any additional questions please do not hesitate to contact Meghan Silva, CAGS, NCSP via email (Meghan.RaySilva001@umb.edu).

If you wish to participate, please use the following link to the survey.



Participation in Transition Planning

Devadrita Talapatra, Ph.D., of the University of Denver, and Gabrielle Wilcox, Psy.D., of the University of Calgary are seeking approximately 250 school psychologists to assist with understanding the role of school psychologists in transition services for secondary students with an intellectual disability. This study hopes to explore potential role expansion opportunities for school psychologists, as well as identify areas for improvement in transition services and post-school opportunities for students with intellectual disabilities. Participation in the study is entirely voluntary and should take no more than 15-20 minutes. Additionally, study participants have the option to enter a drawing for 1 of 10 $30 gift certificates to Amazon.com. 

To participate in the survey, use the following link and survey password (transition).

Living the dream: Building self-determination to improve postsecondary outcomes

Pete Gladstone, a doctoral student of school psychology at the University of Denver, is conducting a survey study that investigates school psychologists’ knowledge of, training in, and use of evidence-based self-determination interventions for students with disabilities. This survey is only meant to be completed by school psychologists who are currently practicing at least two (2) days per week in middle and/or high schools.

If you are a school psychologist currently practicing in middle/high schools, I would sincerely appreciate your participation in this survey. For the first 120 participants, a $1 donation will be made to the American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities in your honor. Your response is extremely valuable, as it will help to guide the way that school psychologists are prepared to help students with disabilities achieve their postsecondary goals. The survey is voluntary and confidential, and should take approximately six (6) minutes. The research conducted in this study has been approved by the Institutional Review Board (IRB) at the University of Denver (DU). There are no foreseeable significant risks to participating in this study. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact the researcher, Pete Gladstone, at peter.gladstone@du.edu. Or, you may contact the dissertation chair, Devadrita Talapatra, Ph.D., at devadrita.talapatra@du.edu. If you have any questions about the IRB process at DU, please contact Ms. Mary Travis at mary.travis@du.edu. Thank you for your time and dedication to school psychology!


Therapeutic Homework Among Youth: The Role of Clinician Attitude, Client Age, and Presenting Problem

The purpose of this study is to gain a greater understanding of the role of homework in clinical work with youth, clinicians’ attitudes and practices as it relates to homework, what variables may predict homework use, as well as what types of homework they would assign to a hypothetical case. This survey is being conducted by doctoral student Veronica Milito at St. John's University. You may contact her with questions regarding this survey at veronica.milito18@my.stjohns.edu. 

To participate in the survey, please use this link

Washington State Association of School Psychologists
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